Paraben Free Eczema Creams

Paraben Free Eczema Creams

Elizabeth Scott

There are many, many creams marketed to people suffering with eczema. At AD RescueWear we’ve tried quite a few in the last few years on our own kids and ourselves. One ingredient we try to steer clear of is parabens. Parabens are a group of chemicals used as preservatives in personal care products and some foods to extend shelf life and prevent bacteria and mold. The main health concern regarding parabens is they may be endocrine (hormone) disruptors. Of course, we wouldn’t want bacteria or mold in our products either, but many companies have found ways to prevent it without parabens. Five parabens are currently banned in Europe. And while they aren’t banned in the US, there is more awareness about harmful toxins present in our personal and cosmetic products. If you’re concerned, look around at your local drug or grocery store and you’ll see many products available today labeled “paraben free”.

Luckily there are many options, but we’ve chosen just a few to profile. Some paraben free products are composed of organic or natural ingredients and some contain standard chemicals but do not contain parabens. While some people do well with the addition of natural and organic herb based formulas, some do not. The products we profile here are a mix of both. My son who suffered with eczema on his face and body was unable to use any organic eczema cream with calendula. So, for his skin we chose products with less fragrance and less herbal ingredients – in fact the less ingredients the better we found. For my own dry skin, I do prefer to use organic and natural ingredients, but I still must be careful as I have sensitive skin with some small areas of eczema on my hands.

It’s always a good idea before trying a new product on yourself or your children, to carefully check ingredients. Test a small amount before using on large parts of your body in case you are sensitive to an ingredient. And if there’s an ingredient you’re unfamiliar with don’t hesitate to ask your physician. We hope you find one that works for you!

Some Paraben Free Eczema Creams:

  • Skin Fix - I live in Denver, Colorado where it’s extremely DRY! This has been my go to this winter for my hands. I wash my hands a lot and this stands up to a couple of hand washings before I need to reapply. According to the website, Skin Fix believes in a natural “skin safe” approach to their products, leaving out not only parabens but other possible skin irritants such as alcohols and fragrance. We were excited to see the Skin Fix Eczema line has the National Eczema Association Seal of Acceptance as do the Wrap-E-Soothe products. For a full list of ingredients visit the website.
  • Vanicream Products – At AD RescueWear, we're big fans of this brand. Vanicream products are carried on the AD RescueWear website because they are doctor recommended, worked well for our kids, and wash well from our Wrap-E-Soothe clothing. Most importantly the products are free from common chemical irritants such as; dyes, fragrance, masking fragrance, lanolin, parabens, formaldehyde, formaldehyde releasers, other preservatives and they are sulfate, phosphate and gluten free. Vaniply is a great barrier ointment.
  • ROYO Naturals Organic Manuka Skin Soothing Cream – Manuka honey is not only moisturizing but has been shown to have natural anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties as well as being moisturizing. This brand from The Eczema Company is comprised of organic olive Oil, organic beeswax, filtered water, grape seed oil, organic new zealand manuka Honey and manuka oil extract. It has a great texture and is a very popular cream for eczema sufferers.
  • Zoe Organics Cream – The texture and ingredient list for this product is very luxurious. It’s full of organic ingredients and really moisturizes. And the price point is great for something with this many organic ingredients.

We hope you find a cream that works for you and your family. If you have a favorite we left out let us know! We would love to hear from you!

Reference: 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3941901/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18484575